Top tracks on Soundclound

#Science

  • Cosmic Queries: Minds and Machines
    StarTalk Radio
    59:08
    Science
    179,885

    Explore the inner workings of the human mind, the mysteries of memory, The Matrix, deep learning, the ethics of driverless cars, ELIZA, and much more with Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and neuroscientist Dr. Gary Marcus. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-minds-and-machines/ Image Credit: metamorworks/iStock.

  • Juno: Crossing Jupiter's Bow Shock
    NASA
    00:13
    Science
    2,325,460

    Juno will improve our understanding of the solar system's beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter.

  • Kepler: Star KIC7671081B Light Curve Waves to Sound
    NASA
    00:20
    nasa
    1,598,485
  • Juno: Entering Jupiter's Magnetosphere
    NASA
    00:16
    Science
    1,970,834

    Juno will improve our understanding of the solar system's beginnings by revealing the origin and evolution of Jupiter.

  • Kepler: Star KIC12268220C Light Curve Waves to Sound
    NASA
    00:07
    nasa
    1,651,426
  • Voyager: Lightning on Jupiter
    NASA
    00:08
    nasa
    1,656,514
  • Stardust: Passing Comet Tempel 1
    NASA
    00:09
    nasa
    1,423,218
  • Voyager: Interstellar Plasma Sounds
    NASA
    00:12
    nasa
    1,463,213
  • Cassini: Saturn Radio Emissions #2
    NASA
    00:13
    space
    1,406,595

    Saturn is a source of intense radio emissions, which were monitored by our Cassini spacecraft. The radio waves are closely related to the auroras near the poles of the planet. These auroras are similar to Earth's northern and southern lights. This is an audio file of radio emissions from Saturn.

  • Chorus Radio Waves within Earth's Atmosphere
    NASA
    00:29
    nasa
    1,738,055

    Courtesty of Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS)aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes team at the University of Iowa

  • Whistler Waves
    NASA
    00:53
    Science
    527,857

    Whistler waves as heard by the EMFISIS instrument aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes as it passed around Earth. Credits: NASA/University of Iowa

  • Cassini: Saturn Radio Emissions #1
    NASA
    00:19
    nasa
    1,060,010

    Saturn is a source of intense radio emissions, which were monitored by our Cassini spacecraft. The radio waves are closely related to the auroras near the poles of the planet. These auroras are similar to Earth's northern and southern lights. This is an audio file of radio emissions from Saturn.

  • Basketball Physics, with NBA Legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
    StarTalk Radio
    57:22
    Science
    194,124

    Slam dunks, skyhooks, three-pointers, bank shots and rebounds – Investigate the physics of basketball with host Neil deGrasse Tyson, NBA All-Time leading scorer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, comic co-host Chuck Nice, astrophysicist Charles Liu, and NBA analyst Jim Spanarkel. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/basketball-physics-with-nba-legend-kareem-abdul-jabbar/ Photo Credit: Brandon Royal.

  • Digital Space
    NASA
    53:28
    Science
    1,191

    Episode 45 features Annette Moore, the Director of our Information Resources Director and the Chief Information Officer at the Johnson Space Center, who tells us about data and information in space as well as the tech we use for human spaceflight operations, including space station imagery and how it's changed over time. Moore discusses how the Johnson Space Center is handling the multiple petabytes of data to preserve the history of the human spaceflight program. This episode was recorded on April 18, 2018

  • Cosmic Queries – Climate Science, with Bill Nye
    StarTalk Radio
    53:58
    Science
    260,638

    Bill Nye the Science Guy is back to delve into one of his favorite topics of discussion: climate change. Joined by co-host Chuck Nice and Kate Marvel, an Associate Research Scientist at NASA GISS and Columbia University, Bill and company answer fan’s Cosmic Queries about our changing climate. IMPORTANT NOTE FOR STARTALK FANS: Hey, StarTalkers: How would you like to “Keep Looking Up” at clear, starry skies, from the deck of a StarTalk themed-cruise, along with Neil deGrasse Tyson and your fellow StarTalk fans? We’re considering a cruise, and we want to know what you think in this survey: www.startalkradio.net/CosmicCruise. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-climate-science-with-bill-nye/

  • Plasmaspheric Hiss
    NASA
    00:12
    Science
    617,225

    Plasmaspheric hiss waves as heard by NASA’s Polar mission as it passed around Earth. Credits: NASA/University of Iowa

  • Cassini: Enceladus Sound
    NASA
    00:10
    nasa
    888,015

    Saturn’s ocean-bearing moon also bears some spooky sounds! Here’s one captured by our Cassini spacecraft.

  • Off Track: A south-eastern red-tailed black cockatoo fledgling
    ABC Science
    00:54
    Bird song
    4,673

    The recording of a south-eastern red-tailed black cockatoo fledgling preparing to fly. Supplied by Daniella Teixeira.

  • Plasmawaves - Chorus
    NASA
    00:12
    Science
    548,326

    Chorus waves as heard by the EMFISIS instrument aboard NASA’s Van Allen Probes as it passed around Earth. Credits: NASA/University of Iowa

  • Mockingbird Nightsong
    Lang Elliott – Music of Nature
    07:52
    Nature Recording
    19,999

    MOCKINGBIRD NIGHT SONG: A Northern Mockingbird singing at night with crickets and gray treefrogs sounding off in the background. Recorded 11:30pm 27 May 2016, near Upperville, Virginia. © Lang Elliott. Microphone: quasi-binaural SASS (Stereo Ambient Sampling System) modified for use with Sennheiser MKH20 microphones. THE NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD is well-known for its habit of singing at night. What most folks do not know is that the night-singers are primarily unmated males, which may sing almost continuously both day and night (especially when the moon is bright), in their quest to locate a mate. I managed to capture the featured recording during a recent expedition, which began with a social event: my partner’s niece was graduating from high school and we went down to attend the ceremony. Given how close we were to Washington D.C., I never imagined that I would get a usable recording (too many cars and jets). But we spent the night in a ranch house surrounded by large fields, and as luck would have it, there was a resident mockingbird that sang throughout much of the night. Resisting my urge to get some much-needed sleep (I was up until nearly 2am the night before, recording frogs), I ventured out around 11pm and walked a considerable distance to his singing tree, which was at the edge of a field. Crickets trilled gently from the grass and a chorus of Gray Treefrogs produced a drone from nearby forest, no doubt sounding off from a pond or swampy area. Not a bad catch for countryside near a major metropolis. Although not exactly a meditative recording, I am quite pleased to document night-singing in this species, along with enough ambient sounds to add spaciousness to the recording. This particular singer is doing some imitations, but the majority of his phrases seem to be of his own device. Rather than analyze his song phrases, I’ve chosen to simply enjoy the soundscape without thinking too much about it. Mockingbird Nightsong, delivered to you on a golden platter! What’ya think?